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Posts Tagged ‘Marriage’

Introverted Partner? 5 Things to Know

If your partner is an introvert, you’ve probably noticed that their idea of a good time is a bit different than yours. While you – as an extrovert – more often prefer a party, your partner would usually rather stay home for quiet evening as a couple. You are energized by social activities; your partner, on the other hand, is energized by time spent alone. To keep this difference from leading to misunderstandings, it’s a good idea to understand how introverts see the world.

 

Read more: http://blogs.webmd.com/art-of-relationships/2016/03/introverted-partner-5-things-to-know.html?ecd=wnl_sxr_040916&ctr=wnl-sxr-040916_nsl-promo-2_title&mb=K2VcbkxhrhREAZ5zC2UpheHnVev1imbCHYS8QQY8uqo%3d

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Six components of the perfect apology

We’ve all heard apologies that made us question the sincerity of the person who is supposed to be saying “I’m sorry.” What makes an apology resonate as truly heartfelt? Six important ingredients, a new study suggests.

Read more: http://www.today.com/health/six-components-perfect-apology-t86211?cid=eml_tes_20160413

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Introverted Partner? 5 Things to Know

If your partner is an introvert, you’ve probably noticed that their idea of a good time is a bit different than yours. While you – as an extrovert – more often prefer a party, your partner would usually rather stay home for quiet evening as a couple. You are energized by social activities; your partner, on the other hand, is energized by time spent alone. To keep this difference from leading to misunderstandings, it’s a good idea to understand how introverts see the world.

Read more: http://blogs.webmd.com/art-of-relationships/2016/03/introverted-partner-5-things-to-know.html?ecd=wnl_emw_041316&ctr=wnl-emw-041316_nsl-promo-1_title&mb=K2VcbkxhrhREAZ5zC2UpheHnVev1imbCHYS8QQY8uqo%3d

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Effects of Marriage on Society

Marriage is the foundational relationship for all of society. All other relationships in society stem from the father-mother relationship, and these other relationships thrive most if that father-mother relationship is simultaneously a close and closed husband- wife relationship. Good marriages are the bedrock of strong societies, for they are the foundations of strong families. In marriage are contained the five basic institutions, all the basic tasks, of society: 1) family, 2) church, 3) school, 4) marketplace and 5) government. These fundamental tasks, well done, in unity between father and mother, make for a very good marriage. Within a family built on such a marriage, the child gradually learns to value and perform these five fundamental tasks of every competent adult and of every functional society.

Read More: http://marripedia.org/effects_of_marriage_on_society

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As a divorce mediator for many years, I thought I was more prepared than anyone for what lay ahead as I faced my own divorce. Well, I was wrong! Here are some of the things no one told me, which I learned from going through it — and coming out on the other side.

Read more: http://www.today.com/health/10-things-i-wish-i-d-known-getting-divorced-t82321?cid=eml_tes_20160416

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When you’re in a relationship with someone, you are bound to get upset with that person at least occasionally. Sometimes, not wanting to offend them, you let the issue go. But other times, you may really want to say something – either because you are so hurt or angry, or because there is a recurring problem that you need to address. It’s important to speak up – but how you do so can mean the difference between solving the problem and making it worse.

 

Read more: http://blogs.webmd.com/art-of-relationships/2016/04/need-to-bring-up-a-problem-heres-how.html?ecd=wnl_sxr_041616&ctr=wnl-sxr-041616_nsl-promo-2_title&mb=K2VcbkxhrhREAZ5zC2UpheHnVev1imbCHYS8QQY8uqo%3d

 

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by Steven M. Harris

  • Deciding to divorce does not happen overnight, and for most couples the process is fraught with ambivalence.
  • Ambivalence is part and parcel of being in a long-term relationship. How we handle that ambivalence is what matters.

read more…

http://family-studies.org/feeling-ambivalent-about-your-marriage-so-is-everyone-else/?utm_source=IFS+Main+List&utm_campaign=72a0715501-Newsletter_95&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c06b05f1ff-72a0715501-104541745

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Catholics, Jews, and mainline Protestants have lower divorce rates than Americans of other religious backgrounds.

read more… http://family-studies.org/what-god-has-joined-together-religion-and-the-risk-of-divorce/?utm_source=IFS+Main+List&utm_campaign=60864c3afc-Newsletter_94&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c06b05f1ff-60864c3afc-104541745

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Rise in remarriage

If he takes another wife, he shall not diminish her food, her clothing, and her marriage rights. Exodus 21:10 (NKJV)

 

According to report by the Pew Research Center[i], in forty percent of marriages begun in 2013, one or both partners had been married before, and close to one-quarter of all currently married adults have previously been married to someone else.  It is of interest to note that both figures have risen sharply since 1960, when just 13 percent of married adults were on their second (or later) marriage.

What is also interesting is that while a growing number of adults have never been married, and more of those who had been married are divorced or widowed, those who had been married are not less likely to remarry.   That is to say that those that have never been married see marriage as less desirable than those whose marriages have ended, regardless of the circumstances.

The report also shows that formerly married seniors have become more likely to remarry, whereas their 25- to 34-year-old counterparts have become less likely to do so. While men have become less likely and women more likely to remarry, men are more likely than women to actually marry again.

According to W. Bradford Wilcox, American Enterprise Institute visiting scholar and director of the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia, research suggests that, on average, couples who remarry are more likely to divorce than those who marry for the first time.  One of the factors that determine whether the new marriage will last is the presence of children, but another important one is whether “the same orientations or vulnerabilities or vices that may have led to earlier divorce — whether depression or drinking too much or something else — can be carried over to the second marriage. For that reason, we see they are generally less stable than intact first marriages.”

While some people are very intentional about not making the same mistakes they made in a first marriage, it is “not always possible to realize those good intentions, given the challenges of new relationships.”

 

Father, help me work as hard as I can to make this marriage last.

[i] http://family-studies.org/the-rise-of-remarriage/?utm_source=IFS+Main+List&utm_campaign=9b4102a4cb-Newsletter_107&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c06b05f1ff-9b4102a4cb-104541745

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Teens and marriage

Both young men and maidens; Old men and children. 13Let them praise the name of the LORD, For His name alone is exalted; His glory is above the earth and heaven. Psalm 148:12-13 (NKJV)

 

Americans now seem to be leaning toward the idea that marriage is more of an option instead of a milestone on the path to adulthood.  It is interesting to note that although the mean age at first marriage has shown an overall increase, the timing of marriage still varies by sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic background.

According to an article by Kelly Roberts, Daniel Hubler, and Kate Kirk[i], Oklahoma has one of the nation’s youngest ages of first marriage as well as one of the highest divorce rates.  Their research team set out to gain greater clarity about how cultural niches might impact adolescents’ attitudes about marriage.  Here’s what they learned:

How groups were similar.  When asked about their general attitudes about marriage, most students agreed that it “takes work” and that it is “for life.”   They were more specific about the types of daily life and relationship skills needed to have a healthy marriage and they listed such things as communication, “not fighting,” learning to cook, getting a job, “commitment,” etc.  Overall, each group seemed to have given a great deal of thought to the issue and considered the notion of marriage seriously.

How groups differed.  One of the focus groups used their grandparents as their reference group.  One of the students made the comment, “I think it’s just our parents’ generation that messed up. I’ve seen my grandparents, and they’ve stuck together.”  Students in other groups spoke about their parents’ marriage in positive terms.

Students in the alternative school group said the ideal age for marriage was 18-22, while students in the suburban group said 25-30 is best.  And finally, when asked whether or not they could successfully navigate a marriage the responses also varied.  One student in a high-income group observed, “Every friend in my group has parents who have been divorced at least once.”  A strong, intact, healthy marriage is still the best lesson for our kids.

 

Father, bless our marriage and may it be a positive lesson for my kids

[i] http://family-studies.org/teens-attitudes-toward-marriage-vary-widely-across-oklahoma/?utm_source=IFS+Main+List&utm_campaign=63a7bf26ba-Newsletter_108&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c06b05f1ff-63a7bf26ba-104541745

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